Education Center

What Do You Want to Learn?

Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee endeavors to provide quality information to our patients.

Please note that these educational resources are for informational purposes only and are not a replacement for a consultation with an Advanced Practice Sleep Medicine Specialist. To schedule an appointment with one of our trained specialists today, please call us at (615) 893-4821.

ARTICLES

What Happens to My Brain When I’m Sleep Deprived?

What Happens to My Brain When I’m Sleep Deprived?

Adequate sleep is the cornerstone of a healthy life. However, sometimes we get busy or we become very interested in something that’s happening late at night, so we don’t go to bed when we should. We might have to cram for a test, view a rare eclipse or maybe we’re...

read more
Insomnia May Increase Risk Of Death

Insomnia May Increase Risk Of Death

According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 1 in 3 adults in America don't get the recommended minimum of seven hours of sleep per night. Some of this is due to lifestyle factors, but many people who don't get enough sleep are suffering from the sleep...

read more

CPAP Preventing Heart Attacks Nightly

In a 12 year study of patients with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) 30% experience cardiovascular events (i.e. heart attack). Marin, Lancet 2005; 365: 1046-53

Partnership With The American Heart Association

Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee is proud to join the American Heart Association in its endeavor to bring increased awareness about how sleep directly impacts heart health. As leaders in the field of sleep medicine, we’re proud to have proven effective outcomes for our patients.

Recently, scientific research backed by the American Heart Association (AHA) has brought renewed attention to the relationship between sleep and heart health. Sleep duration, mostly short sleep, and sleep disorders have emerged as being related to adverse cardiometabolic risk, including obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease.

As a result, they released a statement recommending at least seven hours of sleep per night for adults can help “to promote optimal health”. As part of its determination to promote ideal cardiac health, they’re directly addressing sleep behavior in a public health campaign.

St-Onge M-P, Grandner MA, Brown D, Conroy MB, Jean-Louis G, Coons M, Bhatt DL; on behalf of the American Heart Association Behavior Change, Diabetes, and Nutrition Committees of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Clinical Cardiology; and Stroke Council. Sleep duration and quality: impact on lifestyle behaviors and cardiometabolic health: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation.

Sleep Centers of Middle Tennessee and Middle Tennessee State University Co-Founded the Sleep Research Consortium (SRC) to Promote Healthy Sleep and Sleep-Related Chronic Disease Prevention.

The mission of the SRC is to facilitate research projects, community-based programs, and initiatives that promote population and individual wellness through healthy sleep and sleep-related chronic disease prevention and reduction.

Through sleep-focused research and initiatives, the SRC seeks to fulfill the following goals and objectives:

  • To promote the health and well-being of Tennesseans through information sharing, development and implementation of research projects and community-based programs projects, and initiatives that focus on healthy sleep and sleep-related chronic disease prevention and reduction, obesity prevention and reduction, and improved population and individual health;
  • To collaborate and share best practices with other researchers, clinicians, public health practitioners, and community stakeholders;
  • To develop and implement projects, programs, and interventions, programs which meet a need and improve the health of Tennesseans, and that may be replicated nationally;
  • To advance and support interdisciplinary scholarly and research activity specific to healthy sleep;
  • To develop and strengthen partnerships within the university, the community, the state, and nationally who have vested interest in healthy living, specifically healthy sleep and reduction of obesity and chronic disease which may be associated with poor sleep;
  • To serve as a resource to the MTSU community on projects and initiatives related to sleep, obesity, chronic disease reduction and population health;

If you would like to learn more about the research of Sleep Research Consortium and how you can get involved, please visit https://sleepresearchconsortium.com/.

Talk to someone about your sleep

 

Learn how we can help